Recent Posts

  • IN CONVERSATION WITH PRIYANTHA UDAGEDARA | by Shaahima Rashid

    Ideologically motivated brush strokes strike easel in Priyantha Udagedara’s new series ‘Orientalism,’ with layer upon layer from an almost hypnotic palette of hues for only the true enthusiast to unravel – exposing the paradox that is beautiful horror. Udagedara challenges the orientalist’s notion of foreign beauty and invites the viewer to unearth -and concurrently interpret- what is beneath the deception… Continue reading "IN CONVERSATION WITH PRIYANTHA UDAGEDARA | by Shaahima Rashid"

  • APPERCEIVING 1983, an exhibition by Gayan Prageeth

    As Sri Lanka begins to rebuild itself and attempts at reconciliation begin to take shape, the exhibition “Apperceiving 1983” looks back at the events that transpired between the people of Sri Lanka and the violent effect it had on numerous lives, memories and futures.

  • STRANGERS AND SYMBOLS | an essay by Sandev Handy

    How are we to put a finger on our present time? It seems as though Sri Lanka is hungry and in a hurry to be fed. A frenzied cultivating of car horns, enterprise and culture; the surging of new economies, market shares and highways. A future differed is revealing itself in an ahistorical outpouring: a country in a new-found state of aspiration

  • SUTRA | an exhibition by Nuwan Nalaka

    Nuwan Nalaka’s compelling works float between the temporal and the spiritual, remaining in neither. Instead they are always on the move—always becoming. Every painting carries a visible or invisible destination, suggesting a grand ending—be it in the sky, behind a mountain, or a in a mystic form lurking through a thicket.

  • THE INCOMPLETE THOMBU | A review by Josephine Breese

    Artist T. Shanaathanan's work stands to evade this blockage with projects dedicated to the persecution and displacement of the Tamil people of Northern Sri Lanka. Shanaathanan's practise is broadly akin to that of a social anthropologist and activist, but channelled through heavily evocative draughtsmanship, installation art and as a senior lecturer of History of Art at the University of Jaffna. Shanaathanan returns to an imaginary notion of the elemental grounding of 'home', following its theft from this part of the country during the civil war.

  • CAB 2014 REVIEWED BY SANJANA HATTOTUWA | LT Magazine March 2014

    And that in a nutshell was CAB for me – a patchwork of artists, who with varying fidelity to the theme ‘Making History’ showcased a diverse spectrum of art that ranged from the extremely compelling, insightful and political to the “I could have done that when drunk and sold it as art” type installations and wall-hangings.

  • SRI LANKAN CONTEMPORARY ART | The White Review

    SRI LANKA HAS DEVELOPED A THRIVING, VITAL CONTEMPORARY ART SCENE OVER THE PAST TWENTY YEARS. NEW ARTISTS ARE EMERGING TO COMPLEMENT THE WORK OF THEIR PREDECESSORS, WHO BLAZED TRAILS IN THEIR EMPLOYMENT OF NOVEL, OFTEN CONTROVERSIAL, MODES OF PRACTICE. YET CONTEMPORARY ART REMAINS FIRMLY OUTSIDE THE MAINSTREAM IN SRI LANKA, SUPPORTED BY A SMALL PERCENTAGE OF THE GENERAL PUBLIC AND THE EFFORTS OF A HANDFUL OF INDIVIDUALS, UNIVERSITIES AND GALLERIES.

  • LT ARTicle #1 2012 | Ex Libris Artist by Saskia Fernando

    There is a fair bit of history behind the artist’s love affair with literature and books. In the 19th century artists illustrated for authors as a side job and then in the 20th century, artists’ work was published, moving the focus from the text to the visual compositions within the pages of these books. Such limited edition books were better known as the livre d’artiste. Quite simply published art now refers to printed work by artists, either on a wider or limited edition scale.